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Articles written by Nancy Royan


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  • May, May Flies

    Nancy Royan|May 30, 2024

    May seems to have just began but then May flies! It is May, and time for mayflowers, mayapples and mayflies! Spring is a season bursting with cherry blossoms, the scent of lilacs, and the landscape devoid of winter white. Just like the mayfly, we are emerging from the depths of winter and able to move into the light. Mayflies are said to have been around before dinosaurs. “After more than 350 million years of evolution, they have perfected the art of life.” They start as an egg, turn into a naiad (water nymph!), emerge from the water, ful...

  • I've been to a lot of places

    Nancy Royan|May 16, 2024

    I’ve been to a lot of places, but I’ve never been in Cahoots. Apparently, you can’t go alone, you have to be in Cahoots with someone. I’ve also never been in Cognito, either. I hear no one recognizes you there. I have, however been in Sane. They don’t have an airport; you have to be driven there. I have made several trips. Ever heard the phrase “the real McCoy”? It refers to a ground-breaking inventor who revolutionized the railroad industry. Elijah McCoy was born to parents who fled slavery on the Underground Railroad. Elijah trained as a...

  • Volunteers

    Nancy Royan|Apr 25, 2024

    We always need volunteers. Volunteers keep the lights on. They cement the community together. Volunteers often help keep the doors open and enable organizations to deliver vital programs and services. They lend their expertise, to fundraising campaigns and special events. Volunteering for a good cause changes lives and doesn’t just benefit the people you’re helping. Beyond the obvious benefits of helping out in the community and making a difference, volunteering can both further a career and improve your life. Everybody wins. Did you hear abo...

  • Listen, my children, and you shall hear

    Nancy Royan|Apr 18, 2024

    “Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere, On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five; Hardly a man is now alive Who remembers that famous day and year.” The poem was Longfellow’s embodiment of Revere as the courage and determination of the ordinary citizens in the Revolutionary War. Overall, Paul Revere was just a cog in an elaborate warning system. In 1774 and 1775, the Boston Committee of Correspondence and the Massachusetts Committee of Safety employed Paul Revere as an express rider to carry news, messages, and copies of important docum...

  • A-Hummin' And A-Buzzin'

    Nancy Royan|Apr 11, 2024

    And a kazoo to you too. Remember an instrument that produces a-buzzing sound when played and consists of a small metal or plastic tube with a side hole covered by a thin membrane? Bet many have tried to play one. It was a real humdinger! A kazoo is a handheld, novelty instrument usually made of tin or plastic. It creates a-buzzing sound when played. The tone quality of a kazoo is determined by the quality of the membrane or resonator. You don’t’ blow into a kazoo to create the desired sound; you have to hum into it. A popular anecdote sug...

  • Ready, Set, Library! Woh-who-ey! Huzzah!

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Apr 4, 2024

    Race to discover the possibilities at your library during National Library Week, April 7 – 13. Race to discover April10th. Libraries give a green light to something truly special: a place to connect with others, learn new skills, and focus on what matters most. Find some life pleasures at our library’s author talks, musical entertainers, and book clubs. Enjoy the scenic route through the stacks to find your new favorite story. Or take a look at our library’s website: https://cascademtwedsworthlibrary.org for up-to-date library news, histo...

  • Educating the Bear

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Feb 29, 2024

    The library is offering some bear education. Are we educating the bears?? Well, as that might be a good course of action, it might be more productive not to try and educate the bears, as they seem to do their own thing and keep on learning how to open those doors. So let us offer some education to us humans who also like to ignore common sense and do our own thing which often leads into interesting situations. Bears are fuzzy, adorable, but can be crazy terrifying. Bears of course, have been seen right here in our own backyards. And while your...

  • How the South Shaped Montana

    Nancy Royan|Feb 22, 2024

    Many things shaped Montana during its early years. The sheep came, then the cattlemen. This helped shape the state in a variety of ways. Whether it was barbed wire or the brutal winter of 1886/188,7 which Russel immortalized in his drawings/sketches. The discovery of copper in Butte in 1882, the growth of the timber industry (thanks to the railroads and the Butte mines) or just the rapid growth of population all helped to form early Montana Life. These are well noted in the annals of history. However, many don’t realize that the Civil War a...

  • The Heists That Made 'Em Famous

    Nancy Royan|Feb 15, 2024

    Art Napping: the stealing of paintings, sculptures, or other forms of visual art from galleries, museums or other public and private locations. The history of art is marked by the theft of works, from Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Gioconda” stolen from the Louvre in 1911 and then recovered years later, or even the famous work “America” ​​by Maurizio Cattelan taken away from Blenheim Palace in 2019, 103 kg of solid gold in the shape of a toilet, never found again. Stolen art is often resold or used by criminals as collateral to secure loans. In 147...

  • USS Nevada (BB-36)

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Feb 8, 2024

    There is no greater symbol of a country’s determination to defend its freedom than a warship. USS Nevada was named after the 36th state. Launched in 1914, Nevada was a leap forward in dreadnought technology. Every subsequent US battleship included triple gun turrets, oil in place of coal for fuel, geared steam turbines for greater range, and the “all or nothing” armor principle. These features made Nevada, alongside sister ship Oklahoma, the first US Navy “standard-type” battleships. Nevada’s construction was authorized by an Act of Congress...

  • A Different Perception

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Feb 1, 2024

    Food plays an integral, but routine part in our day-to-day lives and we don’t think much about it except what to eat at our next meal or- how about that snack. However, in the past, food was once thought of as noble and in a different aspect of what we might think of today. Onions. We rarely consider them as anything more than culinary devices, items to be sliced, diced, and tossed into a hot pan to serve as an aromatic backbone of a savory dish. Today, you would probably think of sending or bringing flowers to a funeral. Things were done a m...

  • Proverbs, Idioms, and Sayings

    Nancy Royan|Jan 25, 2024

    We’ve all heard ‘em. We’ve all said a lot of them, but do you know the meaning behind ‘em or what the difference is between a proverb and idiom? What is the difference between a proverb and an idiom? A proverb is a short, popular piece of advice or an observation that is generally held to be true. Examples of proverbs that give advice: Don’t count your chickens before they’ve hatched. Never bite the hand that feeds you. Examples of proverbs that are observations: Rome was not built in a day. A penny saved is a penny earned. Often, these popular...

  • Things You Might Not Have Known

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Jan 11, 2024

    Well, now... Here's something I bet you never knew before, and now that it is known, it is important to send it on to the more intelligent in the hope that they, too, will feel enlightened. Before the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, the French, anticipating victory over the English, proposed to cut off the middle finger of all captured English soldiers. Without the middle finger it would be impossible to draw the renowned English longbow and therefore they would be incapable of fighting in the future. This famous English longbow was made of the na...

  • The Brooklyn Bridge and Emily

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Jan 4, 2024

    Imagine the Brooklyn bridge being famous because a rooster was one of the first to cross! When the Brooklyn Bridge was completed after fourteen years of construction, the first to cross was Emily Warren Roebling by carriage. She carried a live rooster as a sign of victory. So why did Emily Roebling carry a rooster across the Brooklyn Bridge? Emily considered that moment of being the first person to cross the bridge as her ‘Ruby Shoe Moment.’ She laughed as “she looked down at the white rooster in her lap. She was riding across the Brook...

  • Library Trivia

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Dec 28, 2023

    Library trivia that is smart, strange, silly, and spooky. A variety of library facts to expand your mind and impress your friends and family! If you stumble across a forgotten library book that’s been hiding on your shelf for weeks, month, or even years, don’t be afraid to return it. In 2015, a former student at Wakefield High School in Virginia sent back a copy of the ‘The Underside of the Leaf’. It was borrowed in 1981 and accidentally mixed in with the student’s family collection. In 2016, the granddaughter of a man who had taken out ‘The...

  • Did you Let the Cat Out of the Bag?

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Dec 21, 2023

    Have you been guilty of letting the cat out of the bag? Or did you spill the beans? How many have turned a blind eye to something? Well-known phrases baffle some, especially the young who don’t hear them that often anymore. There are fascinating stories behind many ever day phrases. We all know that turning a blind eye means pretending not to see something. Generally, we think of terms of wrongdoing when we turn a blind eye. But where did this phrase come from? Research finds it dates back to 1801. Admiral Horatio Nelson sailed into battle as t...

  • First Thanksgiving in Gold Country

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Nov 23, 2023

    “Our first Thanksgiving Day dinner in the territory in the fall of 1863 was one of the memorable dinners I have ever attended. Henry Plummer, desiring to be on good terms with the Chief Justice, Mr. Edgerton, and my husband... invited [us] to dinner…he sent to Salt Lake City, a distance of five hundred miles, and everything that money could buy was served, delicately cooked and with all the style that would characterize a banquet at “Sherry’s” (a fancy restaurant). I now recall to mind that the turkey cost forty dollars in gold (now equal to...

  • Idaho Sues Montana Over Stolen Land

    Nancy Royan|Nov 16, 2023

    Have you ever wondered why Montana looks the way it is?? Why do we have that funny western border? Then Idaho looks a bit weird in itself. Why that panhandle? Some maintain that Montana stole part of Idaho way back when. In 1863 President Lincoln sent well-respected lawyer Sidney Edgerton to the Idaho Territory as Chief Justice. He immediately recognized that the remote gold fields would be extremely valuable to the Union and the gold camps needed their own territorial government. He convinced Congress in May of 1864 to create the Montana...

  • It's Treatment Time for the Bookaholics

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Oct 5, 2023

    Once again Wedsworth Library has a AAA treatment program for Bookaholics. The first step is admitting it. The second step is to keep right on reading. You might be a Bookaholic If: When trouble strikes, you head to a book sale. You will either be able to solve the problem, or simply have something to read as the world crashes down on you. You might be a Bookaholic If: When you are Cold, you buy a book. You’ll still be cold but you’ll have books! The picture window in your wallet displays your library card instead of your driver's license. You...

  • Friends of the Library and Wedsworth Library Book Sale

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Sep 28, 2023

    As Dory would say "I need to stop buying books. Oh!! Look, a Book Sale!!!" Yep, Dory has found another great deal. The Friends of the Library and Wedsworth Library are having their annual book sale on Saturday October the 7th from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. for your first chance or Sunday the 8th from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. for your last chance to obtain the special item you have been hoping to squirrel away for this winter’s reading when the snows a swirling round your front door. Looks to be a long cold winter, you might wanna have a big s...

  • Back-to-Back American Solar Eclipses!

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Sep 21, 2023

    In less than a year’s time, there will be 2 amazing eclipse-viewing opportunities! An annular eclipse on Saturday, October 14th, 2023 and a total eclipse on April 8th, 2024. This will be the last time any solar eclipse will be visible within the United States until 2045. We are all ecstatic to be able to bring you programs, solar sun glasses and be a part of your thrilling experience. Do you remember the total solar eclipse that crossed the continental United States from coast to coast on August 21, 2017? We hope you were in the 70-mile-wide p...

  • Rediscovering Your Local Library

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Aug 17, 2023

    Through the course of Life many of us have discovered a great many things: the post office key doesn’t work in the car and vice versa; things do not cook very well if the oven’s not on; coffee tastes better when you add the coffee; and clothes come out cleaner if you put them in the washing machine before running through all the cycles. Life is a journey of Discovery. So add one more trail to this journey, come discover your library. Every child deserves a best beginning and lifetime of discovering. Every child deserves a life of reading and...

  • Yummy Status Symbols

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Aug 3, 2023

    Symbols have always been used to signal one's status. Status symbols come in all shapes and sizes. Some rate diamonds or diamond tiaras as status symbols. Others desire the luxury cars, multiple homes, art objects, family signet rings, heirloom watches, or other multiple material objects. But what about food? Did you ever consider food as a status symbol? Here comes that sweet deal from across the seas. The country's must-have accessory came to grace the tables of the very richest aristocrats' social gatherings. The status symbol of the 1700s w...

  • A Peek at Cascade's History

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedsworth Memorial Library|Jul 27, 2023

    Cascade has evolved over time. Buildings have come and gone. Buildings have changed ownership or morphed from one business to another. As most know the Homestead/Canyon Life Church used to be the Sportsman Bar. But did you know at one time a Mexican restaurant filled that slot? Mike DiAngelis has a picture of Central Avenue from the river’s viewpoint towards the ‘old’ school – ya know the one that was 3 stories tall. This picture according to Mike has a perfect picture of a sign hangin outside the building of what became the Sportsman Bar nam...

  • Who Are You?

    Nancy Royan, Librarian, Wedworth Memorial Library|Jul 13, 2023

    Who are you? Or better yet – what label do you place on that person next to you? Labels. Social trends of today seem obsessed with labels. Many of us growing up didn’t really address labels. It was ‘the kids down the block’; the ‘cascade kids, (to make it relevant to this community); ‘the Simms kids’; ‘’Ulm kids’; the ‘country kids’ or to kids the ‘old people’ (which was everyone older than them). Media now appears to place labels on EVERYONE! And they have definitions. Not one to pay much attention to these labels, the definitions and labels t...

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